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Improving the Oredigger

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Written by Lucy Orsi

Posted on 08 September 2014

The Oredigger Student Newspaper published its first issue in 1920. Since then, the paper has provided a unique forum for students on campus. Over the last ten years, however, the Oredigger has faced some of the same problems that have plagued national papers. Specifically, advertising revenue for the paper has decreased by over 50% since 2009. On top of this, the level of financial support from the school has decreased. In 2009, the paper received approximately $40,000 from the school. Last year, we received just $32,655 during the allocation process.

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Dangers of Meningitis

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Written by katy Dykes

Posted on 07 September 2014

With the number of college cases of meningitis on the rise, The Colorado Academy of Family Physicians is warning university students across the state and country to be on the lookout for the tell tale signs of this disease. Dr. Rick Budensiek of the Colorado Academy of Family Physicians was available to give comments on this dangerous disease. Bacterial meningitis a very virulent disease caused by three types of bacteria: haemophilus influenza type b, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. These bacteria all cause dangerous swelling of the fluid surrounding the spine and brain. Dr. Budensiek notes that the infection occurs mainly in children, teens, and young adults and is very common on college campuses.

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Colloidal Dispersions: Where Various Length Scales Become Correlated

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Written by Katy Dykes

Posted on 07 September 2014

On Friday September 5, Colorado School of Mines was honored to hear a lecture on "Colloidal Dispersions: Where Various Length Scales Become Correlated" by Dr. Jared Chun of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Chun received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and is now performing and leading research looking at various aspects of structured fluids: multiphase flows, granular materials, and suspension rheology. He is also performing studies on millimeter wave rheometry and the prediction of magnetic permeability of ferrites.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 09/08/14

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Written by Kellen Malone

Posted on 07 September 2014

Honolulu, Hawaii - A team of scientists led by Brent Tully from the University of Hawaii in Honolulu have found that the Milky Way Galaxy is actually part of a larger supercluster named Laniakea (Hawaiian for "immeasurable heaven") that is 520 million light years across. Previously, the Milky Way was thought to be part of a smaller galaxy cluster called Virgo, a 110 million light year section of space that is also suspected to be part of Laniakea. The team charted the motions of galaxies to infer the gravitational landscape of regions in space to determine where one supercluster cuts off.

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Ebola Mania: Africa in Peril

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Written by Leah Hill

Posted on 07 September 2014

The first case of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) appeared in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks in Nzara, Sudan and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo in central Africa. The virus is named after the Ebola River, which is located near the town of Yambuku. It has a fatality rate of 50% when treated, up to 90% when left untreated, and is also lethal to non-human primates and duikers (a species of medium sized antelope). The 2014 Ebola outbreak is the largest outbreak in history and the first to occur in Western Africa. The countries currently affected include Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is working together with U.S. government agencies, the WHO (World Health Organization), and other domestic and international partners to prevent the spread of the virus and care for those already infected.

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Headlines from Around the World

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Written by Frank Knafelc

Posted on 07 September 2014

Three airplane flights have been compelled to make premature landings due to reclining seats. The first was on August 24 when two passengers on a United Airlines flight got into a fight after one used a "knee defender device" on the other's reclining seat. The second was only days later when a Frenchman was arrested on his flight from Paris to Miami and caused his plane to land early after assaulting a flight crewmember about a reclining seat. The third was on September 2 when a woman was "hit" in the head by the passenger in front of her reclining the seat too far. The woman's tantrum forced her Delta Airlines flight flying from New York's La Guardia Airport to West Palm Beach Florida to make an unexpected landing in Jacksonville.

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Spring 2014 Allocation Results

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Written by Oredigger

Posted on 27 April 2014

Final Spring 2014 Allocation Results

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"Medicine Women of the Plains" as told by Red Feather Woman/Rose Red Elk

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Written by Hope Sisley

Posted on 27 April 2014

In March, Rose Red Elk visited Mines to help campus celebrate Women's History Month.Rose Red Elk, also known as Red Feather Woman, came in traditional dress and shared songs and stories with the audience. She is a member of the Sioux/Assiniboine Tribes, hailing from the Fort Peck Reservation in northeast Montana. She described how she grew up listening to tribal folk stories but began her career in science and technology. While at Texas A&M, she started that college's first Native American science and engineering group. She had a promising career at IBM, but decided that her true calling was the arts. She has now been a professional singer and storyteller for over twenty years; she has put out four award-winning albums and is currently working on a comic book for the Department of the Interior.

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Scientific discoveries this week: 4/28/14

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Written by Ramiro Rodriguez

Posted on 27 April 2014

Ilulissat, Greenland - A study led by Shfaqat Khan from the Technical University of Denmark has revealed that the Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world, is melting at a much faster rate than previously thought. A portion of the before unnoticed melting comes from the Northeastern Greenland, which was thought to be the last stable part of Greenland in terms of melting ice and glacial break-away. Because of warmer summers due to climate change, one of the glaciers in the South, Jakobshavn Isbrae, is retreating at four times the rate it had been in 1997.

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Trust, technology and expertise in mining conflicts

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Written by Hope Sisley

Posted on 27 April 2014

On March 19th, the Schultz Family Leadership in Humanitarian Engineering Speaker Series kicked off with Dr. Michael L. Dougherty, from Illinois State University. Funded by the CEO of Dauntless Energy, the series will continue twice a semester for the next two years, highlighting social and corporate responsibility.

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What Happened to the Ancient Martian Atmosphere?

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Written by Leah Hill

Posted on 27 April 2014

mars soloOn Tuesday, April 22nd, David Brain gave a lecture all about Mars. There has been much discussion about whether or not Mars had water on its surface and what happened to that water. David Brain works at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics as well as the Department of Astrophysics and Atmospheric Science at CU Boulder. He has spent a lot of time studying the surface of Mars, and examining the differences between Mars and Earth that would cause such different environments, when the ancient Martian surface was likely similar to Earth's modern environment.

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"I'm Not an Astronaut but I get to Play One at Work"

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Written by Jessica Deters

Posted on 27 April 2014

Penny Pettigrew has the coolest job in the world—she provides live support for astronauts living on the International Space Station. Pettigrew, who graduated from Colorado School of Mines with a BS in Chemistry in 1992, works for NASA in the Payload Operations Integration Center at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Though Pettigrew has never been to space herself, providing live support to astronauts on the ISS allows her to fulfill that childhood dream.

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Headlines from around the world: 4/28/14

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Written by Ramiro Rodriguez

Posted on 27 April 2014

Following a federal appeals court ruling that struck down Federal Communications Commission (FCC) proposed rules to guarantee a free and open internet, the FCC has announced it will propose rules that would allow internet content providers to pay for special lanes to deliver content faster. Consumer advocacy groups are attacking the proposal on the basis that prices for service providers that can afford the fast lanes such as Disney or Netflix would probably be made to raise prices, while at the same time, smaller start-ups will be unable to afford the lanes which would stifle creativity and innovation online.

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